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APA 7th Edition Citation Style Guide: Home

APA update for the 7th edition

Welcome

In 2020, the American Psychological Association released the 7th edition of their publication manual.  This update includes clear guidance on citing media formats, bias-free language guidelines, accessibility guidelines, robust reference examples, and expanded guidance on the publication process. Feel free to contact a librarian for assistance in navigating the transition to APA 7th edition. 

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In-Text Citations

In-Text Citations

In-text citations tell your professor which source you used at a specific point in the paper. In-text citations also correspond to the Reference List at the end of your paper. In-text citations have two formats: Narrative and Parenthetical.
Please ask your professor if you are unsure which type of in-text citations to use in your paper.
 
Examples of in-text narrative citations: 
 
  • Name the author(s) and provide a direct quotation:

Pollan (2001) explains that “the apple, like the settlers themselves, had to forsake its former domestic life and return to the wild before it could be reborn as an American” (p. 13).

  • Name the author and paraphrase:

Michael Pollan (2001) compares the apple to the settler, because both required an experience in the wild in order to fully express the American experience.

 

Examples of in-text parenthetical citations:

  •  Provide a direct quotation without naming the author directly:

“In effect, the apple like the settlers themselves, had to forsake its former domestic life and return to the wild before it could be reborn as an American” (Pollan, 2001, p. 13).    

  • Paraphrase without naming the author directly:

One writer compares the apple to the settler, because both require an experience in the wild in order to fully express the American experience (Pollan, 2001).  

Formatting your Reference List Citations

Reference List Citations

A reference generally has four elements, regardless if it's print or online. Each element answers a question:

  • author: Who is responsible for this work?
  • date: When was this work published?
  • title: What is this work called?
  • source: Where can I retrieve this work?

Your reference list will be organized in alphabetical order by author last name.  Here is an example:

Hauter, W. (2012). Foodopoly: The battle over the future of food and farming in America. New Press.‚Äč

Pollan, M. (2002). The botany of desire: A plant's-eye view of the world. Random House.

Thompson, P. B. (2015). From field to fork: Food ethics for everyone. Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/0-1093/acprof:oco/9780199191684.001.0001  

Help with APA Formatting & Citations

You can always ask a librarian for help. The following websites may also be useful:

Plagiarism Resources

These websites may help you better understand the importance of attribution and avoid plagiarism. 

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